Services

in the City of Tulsa

The Services theme looks at public services and rights that impact Tulsans’ quality of life. From the importance of libraries and access to the information they provide, to the agency of casting a ballot, to the availability of public transportation as an alternative means to private vehicle commuting, the necessity of these essential services and fundamentals to daily life cannot be understated.

The inequities experienced by disadvantaged groups analyzed in this theme are based on geography, race, and mode of transportation.

The topics in the Services theme are Resources, Political Empowerment, and Transportation.

You can see a snapshot of the indicators averaged in this theme in the chart to your right and then visit the sections below for more detail and additional findings.

Tulsa Driller
Tulsa Driller

Read our recent blogs about Services…

Resources

The indicators in the Resources topic are:
  • Geography & Vacant Housing
  • Race & Internet Access
  • Geography & Public Library Hours
Vacant housing can be the result of things like economic blight, rising costs, and foreclosure. City programs like the City of Tulsa’s Working in Neighborhoods program promote reinvestment in neighborhoods and correction of code and safety violations. Internet access and public libraries play important educational, economic, and civic roles in the community. Look at the chart to your right for an overall picture of this topic and then look at each indicator and the scores in context for more detail and additional findings.

Indicators within Resources

  • Geography & Vacant Housing

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of percentages of vacant housing units in north to south Tulsa

    What are the Results?
    North Tulsa: 16.9%; South Tulsa: 9.7%

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    1.742

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    51

    What Did We Find?
    North Tulsa has over one and half times the proportion of vacant housing units (16.9%) as South Tulsa (9.7%).

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    U.S. Census Bureau, 2016 & 2017 American Community Survey, 5-Year Estimates

  • Race & Internet Access

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of percentages of White to Hispanic/Latinx households with computer with high-speed internet

    What are the Results?
    White: 18.2%; Hispanic/Latinx: 14.1%

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
     1.291

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    71

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    U.S. Census Bureau, 2016 & 2017 American Community Survey, 1-Year Estimates

  • Geography & Public Library Hours

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of rates of library hours open per week in midtown to east Tulsa per 1,000 population

    What are the Results?
    Midtown Tulsa: 2.6; East Tulsa: 0.9

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    2.920

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    34

    What Did We Find?
    Libraries are an important space for communities, providing essential services to those who may not have access otherwise. The number of hours per week that a library is open affects who and when a person is able to access not only books, but resources like computers, the internet, educational resources, and job training materials. Libraries in Midtown are open almost three times more per 1,000 people (2.6) than East Tulsa libraries (0.9).

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    Tulsa City-County Library, Locations within City of Tulsa, Hours of Operation, November 2017 & 2018; U.S. Census Bureau, 2016 & 2017 American Community Survey, 5-Year Estimates

Political Empowerment

The indicators in the Political Empowerment topic are:
  • Race & Government Representation
  • Geography & Voter Turnout
  • Geography & Neighborhood/Homeowner Associations
City of Tulsa authorities, boards, and commissions are formalized volunteer citizen committees that work to review municipal policies and programs. Minority representation on these committees could assist in reviewing policies and developing programs that serve the interests of Tulsa’s diverse communities. Increasing voter turnout in underrepresented populations would likewise bolster democratic participation and thus progress towards greater equality. Similarly, neighborhood and homeowner associations serve the interests of their neighborhoods; however, disparities exist in the geographic distribution of active associations. Look at the chart to your right for an overall picture of this topic, and then look at each indicator and the scores in context for more detail and additional findings.

Indicators within Political Empowerment

  • Race & Government Representation

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of rates of White to Hispanic/Latinx members of City of Tulsa authorities, boards, and commissions per 1,000 population

    What are the Results?
    White: 1.0; Hispanic/Latinx: 0.3

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    3.121

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    33

    What Did We Find?
    Authorities, Boards, and Commissions (ABCs) are groups of community volunteers who meet on a variety of topics to help create policies for the city. White Tulsans (1.0) are better represented on City of Tulsa ABCs than Hispanic/Latinx Tulsans (0.3).

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    City of Tulsa (by request), Authorities, Boards, and Commissions Dashboard, December 2017 & 2018; U.S. Census Bureau, 2016 & 2017 American Community Survey, 1-Year Estimates

  • Geography & Voter Turnout

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of voter turnout rates in south to north Tulsa per 1,000 population age 18 and over

    What are the Results?
    South Tulsa: 546.5; North Tulsa: 303.5

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    Ratio: 1.800

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    48

    What Did We Find?
    In a democratic system, voting is a critical way for communities to get their voices heard is by those in positions of power. South Tulsa’s voter turnout rate per 1,000 residents ages 18 and over (546.5) is higher than voter turnout rates in North Tulsa (303.5).

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    Oklahoma State Election Board (by request); U.S. Census Bureau, 2016 & 2017 American Community Survey, 5-Year Estimates

    Note
    Voter turnout for this indicator is measured as those voting in the last general election at time of data collection, which would be 2016 for both 2018 and 2019 reporting.

  • Geography & Neighborhood/Homeowner Associations

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of rates of neighborhood and homeowner associations in south to east Tulsa per 1,000 population

    What are the Results?
    South Tulsa: 1.3; East Tulsa: 0.5

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    2.743

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    36

    What Did We Find?
    Home Owners Associations (HOAs) provide an avenue for residents to participate in their neighborhoods. HOAs can have benefits related to maintenance and general oversight of the community. South Tulsa has the more HOAs per 1,000 residents (1.3) than East Tulsa (0.5).

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    City of Tulsa, Working in Neighborhoods Department, 2017 & 2018; U.S. Census Bureau, 2016 & 2017 American Community Survey, 5-Year Estimates

Transportation

The indicators in the Transportation topic are:
  • Geography & Bus Stop Concentration
  • Mode of Transportation & Commute Time
  • Race & Vehicle Access
Most Tulsans depend on the availability of a vehicle as their primary mode of transportation. For Tulsans who do not have access to a vehicle, however, access to nearby bus stops and convenient schedule times and routes are critical. Poor availability of bus routes and infrequent route schedules can impair a person’s ability to get to work and home or to scheduled appointments and prolong their commute time. Take a look at the chart to your right for an overall picture of this topic, and then look at each indicator and the scores in context for more detail and additional findings.

Indicators within Transportation

  • Geography & Bus Stop Concentration

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of rates of bus stops in midtown to south Tulsa per 1,000 population

    What are the Results?
    Midtown Tulsa: 6.2; South Tulsa: 1.3

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    4.858

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    21

    What Did We Find?
    The location and concentration of bus stops affect how people travel through the city which, for example, can have an impact on job opportunities. Midtown has over four times the amount of bus stops per 1,000 residents (6.2) than South Tulsa (1.3).

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    INCOG (by request), December 2018; U.S. Census Bureau, 2016 & 2017 American Community Survey, 5-Year Estimates

  • Mode of Transportation & Commute Time

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of percentages of individuals who commute by private vehicle to individuals who commute by public transportation with commute times under 30 minutes

    What are the Results?
    Private vehicle: 85.2%; Public transportation: 29.3%

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
     2.912

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    34

    What Did We Find?
    Public transportation can be a barrier to employment, especially when it is unreliable or when schedules are infrequent. Of individuals who use a private vehicle to get to work, 85.2% have a commute time under 30 minutes compared to just 29.3% of individuals who rely on public transportation.

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    U.S. Census Bureau, 2016 & 2017 American Community Survey, 1-Year Estimates

  • Race & Vehicle Access

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of percentages of Black to White households without access to a vehicle

    What are the Results?
    Black: 15.7%; White: 5.6%

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    2.804

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    35

    What Did We Find?
    Black Tulsans (15.7%) are more likely not to have access to a vehicle than White Tulsans (5.6%).

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    U.S. Census Bureau, 2016 & 2017 American Community Survey, 1-Year Estimates

    Note
    Data for this indicator were accessed via Data Ferrett for the following Public Use Microdata Areas (PUMAs):
    • 01201 ‘Tulsa County (Central)–Tulsa City (Central) PUMA, Oklahoma’
    • 01202 ‘Tulsa County (Southeast)–Tulsa (Southeast) & Broken Arrow (West) Cities PUMA, Oklahoma’
    • 01203 ‘Tulsa County (North)–Tulsa (North) & Owasso Cities PUMA, Oklahoma’
    • 01204 ‘Tulsa (West), Creek (Northeast) & Osage (Southeast) Counties–Tulsa City (West) PUMA; Oklahoma’