Housing

in the City of Tulsa

Shelter is a foundational need for all people, without which other needs often cannot begin to be addressed. Many Tulsans face significant obstacles to obtaining and maintaining stable housing. The indicators in this theme are analyzed by race, income, veteran status, disability status, and geography.

The Housing theme focuses on race, income, veterans, disabilities, and geography.

The topics in the Housing theme are Homeownership, Homelessness, and Tenant Stability.

You can see a snapshot of the indicators averaged in this theme in the chart to your right and then visit the sections below for more detail.

Read our recent blogs about Housing…

Homeownership

The indicators in the Homeownership topic are:
  • Race & Homeownership
  • Race & Home Purchase Loan Denial
  • Income & Housing Cost Burden
Building home equity, making an investment, and strengthening credit are just a few of the benefits of homeownership, but many Tulsans experience obstacles preventing them from owning or keeping a home. Look at the chart to your right for an overall picture of this topic, and then look at each indicator and the scores in context for more detail and additional findings.

Indicators within Homeownership

  • Race & Homeownership

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of the percentages of White to Black householders who are homeowners

    What are the Results?
    White: 58.2%; Black: 34.8%

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    1.672

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    54

    What Did We Find?
    White householders are more likely to be homeowners (58.2%) than are Black householders (34.8%).

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    U.S. Census Bureau, 2016 & 2017 American Community Survey, 1-Year Estimates

  • Race & Home Purchase Loan Denial

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of the percentages of Native Americans to Asians who are denied home purchase loans

    What are the Results?
    Native American: 26.4%; Asian: 7.2%

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
     3.667

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    29

    What Did We Find?
    Native Americans have a higher rate of home purchase loan denials (26.4%) than Asian applicants (7.2%). Black applicants are denied at a similar rate to Native Americans and Whites are denied at about the same rate as Asian applicants.

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council, Conventional Purchases by Race

  • Income & Housing Cost Burden

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of the percentages of low-income to higher-income homeowners that spend more than 30% of income on housing expenses

    What are the Results?
    Low-income: 59.3%; Higher-income: 8.7%

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    6.816

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    12

    What Did We Find?
    Rent burden occurs when a renter spends more than 30% of their income on housing costs. Of low income renters (e.g., household income less than $35,000), 59.3% pay 30% or more of their income on rent compared to only 8.7% of higher income renters (e.g., household income greater than or equal to $35,000).

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    U.S. Census Bureau, 2016 & 2017 American Community Survey, 1-Year Estimates

    Note
    Homeowners are classified as low-income for this indicator when their annual household income is less than $35,000 and higher-income when their household income is equal to or greater than $35,000.

Homelessness

The indicators in the Homelessness topic are:
  • Race & Homeless Youth
  • Veteran Status & Homelessness
  • Disability Status & Homelessness
Homelessness cuts across all segments of the population. Limited or poor housing options can place Tulsans at greater risk of homelessness and in turn result in additional negative outcomes. Homelessness can be unexpected and can exacerbate economic, general health, and mental health situations that would be manageable in stable housing situations. Look at the chart to your right for an overall picture of this topic, and then look at each indicator and the scores in context for more detail and additional findings.

Indicators within Homelessness

  • Race & Homeless Youth

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of rates of homeless Native American to White youth per 1,000 youth age 13 to 24

    What are the Results?
    Native American: 33.4; White: 13.7

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    2.440

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    38

    What Did We Find?
    There is a great disparity in the number of homeless youths age 10-24 per 1,000 between Native Americans (33.4) and Whites (13.7).

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    Homeless Management Information System (HMIS), FY2017 & 2018; U.S. Census Bureau, 2016 & 2017 American Community Survey, 1-Year Estimates

    Note
    The data source for this indicator was changed from the 2018 report from one service provider, Youth Services of Tulsa, to the more comprehensive Homeless Management Information System, which includes in its count homeless youth served by all homeless service providers in Tulsa. This data source provides a more accurate and complete picture of youth homelessness. The age range for youth homelessness was revised from 10-24 to 13-24 to better align with definitions used by federal agencies and organizations serving youth.

  • Veteran Status & Homelessness

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of rates of homelessness for veterans to non-veterans per 1,000 adult population

    What are the Results?
    Veterans: 16.4; Non-veterans: 16.8

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    1.53

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    100

    What Did We Find?
    There are many factors that contribute to homelessness, including poverty and mental illness, however, many veterans also are at a higher risk for post-traumatic stress disorder. Despite this, Veterans experience homelessness at a similar rate as civilians in Tulsa. In 2018, however, the rate of homelessness for veterans (21.2) was about one and half times higher than for non-veterans (13.8). In 2019, with a equality score of 100, this means that veterans are no more likely to be homeless than non-veterans.

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    Homeless Management Information System, Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress; U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2016 1-Year Estimates

  • Disability Status & Homelessness

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of rates of homelessness for individuals with a disability to individuals without a disability per 1,000 adult population

    What are the Results?
    Presence of a disability: 30.4; No disability: 10.7

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    2.840

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    35

    What Did We Find?
    Individuals experiencing homelessness are faced with numerous barriers to health, education, and economic stability. There is a large disparity in homelessness between individuals with disabilities and those who do not have a disability. The rate of homelessness for individuals with a disability (30.4) is higher than for those without a disability (10.7).

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    Homeless Management Information System (HMIS), FY2017 & 2018; U.S. Census Bureau, 2016 & 2017 American Community Survey, 1-Year Estimates

Tenant Stability

The indicators in the Tenant Stability topic are:
  • Income & Rent Burden
  • Race & Eviction
  • Geography & Housing Complaints
Renters are faced with unique challenges ranging from finding affordable rental housing to maintaining a positive tenant-landlord relationship. In order for rental housing to be considered affordable, the rent must amount to less than 30% of a tenant’s income. Higher shares spent on rent generally means that other areas of the budget will be shortchanged, resulting in hard choices about what needs or demands can be neglected. Sustained periods of unaffordable rent often lead to eviction as landlords make way for more profitable tenants. Most housing complaints received by the Tulsa Health Department occur when landlords are not responsive to tenant needs. Look at the chart to your right for an overall picture of this topic, and then look at each indicator and the scores in context for more detail and additional findings.

Indicators within Tenant Stability

  • Income & Rent Burden

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of percentages of low-income to higher income renters that spend more than 30% of income on rent

    What are the Results?
    Low-income: 79.9%; Higher-income: 11.6%

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    6.888

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    13

    What Did We Find?
    There is a fairly large disparity between low-income households (79.9%) and higher-income households (11.6%) experiencing rent burden, which is defined as spending more than 30% of income on rent.

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    U.S. Census Bureau, 2016 & 2017 American Community Survey, 1-Year Estimates

  • Race & Eviction

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of eviction rates in non-majority White to majority White census tracts

    What are the Results?
    Non-majority White: 9.5%; Majority White: 6.1%

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    1.557

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    58

    What Did We Find?
    Non-majority Whites experience higher eviction rates (9.5%) than Majority Whites (6.1%).

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    The Eviction Lab, Eviction Statistics, Tulsa County, 2015 & 2016

    Note:
    Census tracts are considered majority White when their White population is 51% or more.

  • Geography & Housing Complaints

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of rates of housing complaints in north to south Tulsa per 1,000 population

    What are the Results?
    North Tulsa: 2.6; South Tulsa: 1.2

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
     2.287

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    39

    What Did We Find?
    The rate of housing complaints is higher in north Tulsa (2.6) than south Tulsa (1.2) per 1,000 population.

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    Tulsa Health Department, Housing Requests, 2017 & 2018 (by request); U.S. Census Bureau, 2016 & 2017 American Community Survey, 5-Year Estimates