Housing

in the City of Tulsa

Housing is a basic need for all people, however many Tulsans face obstacles in obtaining or maintaining stable housing.

The Housing theme focuses on race, income, veterans, disabilities, and geography.

The topics in the Housing theme are Affordability, Homelessness, and Availability.

You can see a snapshot of the indicators averaged in this theme in the chart to your right and then visit the sections below for more detail.

Read our recent blogs about Housing…

Affordability

The indicators in the Affordability topic are:
  • Race & Home Ownership
  • Race & Home Purchase Loan Denial
  • Income & Rent Burden
Building home equity, earning tax deductions and strengthening credit are just a few of the benefits of home ownership, but many Tulsans are not able to take advantage of these benefits.

Look at the chart to your right for an overall picture of this topic, and then look at each indicator and the scores in context for more detail and additional findings.

Indicators within Affordability

  • Race & Home Ownership

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of the percent of White householders to Black householders who are home owners

    What are the Results?
    White 58.0%; Black 31.6%

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    1.835

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    47

    What Did We Find?
    White householders are almost twice as likely to be homeowners (58.0%) than are Black householders (31.6%). Native Americans own homes at a rate similar to Blacks (33.3%), while Hispanic / Latinos (38.8%) and Asians (46.2%) fall in the middle.

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2016 1-Year Estimates

  • Race & Home Purchase Loan Denial

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of the percent of Native American to Asian home purchase loan denials

    What are the Results?
    Native American 27.3%; Asian 11.2%

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    2.438

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    38

    What Did We Find?
    Native Americans have nearly a three times higher rate of home purchase loan denials (27.3%) than Asian applicants (11.2%). Black applicants are denied at a similar rate to Native Americans (25.1%) and Whites are denied at about the same rate as Asian applicants (12.1%).

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council, Conventional Purchases by Race

  • Income & Rent Burden

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of the percentages of low income renter-occupied housing units to higher income renter-occupied housing units that spend more than 30% of their income on rent

    What are the Results?
    Low income 79.1%; Higher income 11.3%

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    7

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    12

    What Did We Find?
    Rent burden occurs when a renter spends more than 30% of their income on housing costs. Of low income renters (e.g., household income less than $35,000), 79.1% pay 30% or more of their income on rent compared to only 11.3% of higher income renters (e.g., household income greater than or equal to $35,000).

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2016 1-Year Estimates

Homelessness

The indicators in the Homelessness topic are:
  • Race & Homeless Youth
  • Veterans & Homelessness
  • Disability & Homelessness
Homelessness cuts across all segments of the population. The focus of these indicators is on race, age, veteran status and presence of a disability. Limited or poor housing options act as a negative catalyst for Tulsans at-risk of Homelessness and can induce additional negative outcomes. Homelessness can be unexpected and can exacerbate economic, general health and mental health situations that would be otherwise tenable in stable housing situations. Additionally, recent economic and housing market factors continue to stretch resources available in the community.

Look at the chart to your right for an overall picture of this topic, and then look at each indicator and the scores in context for more detail and additional findings.

Indicators within Homelessness

  • Race & Homeless Youth

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of the number of Native American to Asian homeless individuals per 1,000 youths age 10-24

    What are the Results?
    Native American 18.9; Asian 1.5

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    12.451

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    1

    What Did We Find?
    The greatest disparity in the number of homeless youths age 10-24 per 1,000 is between Native Americans (18.9) and Asians (1.5). Black youth are homeless at a similar rate to Native Americans (17.4) followed by Whites (11.0).

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    Youth Services Tulsa (by request); U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2016 1-Year Estimates

  • Veterans & Homelessness

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of the rate of homelessness per 1,000 for veterans to non-veterans

    What are the Results?
    Veterans 21.2; Non-veterans 13.8

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    1.53

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    59

    What Did We Find?
    Veterans experience homelessness at a higher rate than civilians. There are many factors that contribute to homelessness, including poverty and mental illness, however, many veterans also are at a higher risk for post-traumatic stress disorder. The rate of homelessness for veterans (21.2) is about one and half times higher than for non-veterans (13.8).

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    Homeless Management Information System, Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress; U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2016 1-Year Estimates

  • Disability & Homelessness

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of the rate of homelessness per 1,000 population for individuals with a disability to individuals without a disability

    What are the Results?
    Presence of a disability 30.6; No disabilities 8.8

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    3.479

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    31

    What Did We Find?
    Individuals experiencing homelessness are faced with numerous barriers to health, education, and economic stability. There is a large disparity in homelessness between individuals with disabilities and those who do not have a disability. The rate of homelessness for individuals with a disability (30.6) is close to three and a half times higher than for those without a disability (8.8).

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    Homeless Management Information System, Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress; U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2016 1-Year Estimates

Availability

The indicators in the Availability topic are:
  • Race & Overcrowding
  • Geography & Housing Choice Vouchers
  • Race & Housing Complaints
Overcrowding in homes can be a symptom of economic hardships. Many families live in housing that is too small for the number of people housed due to an inability to afford larger housing. Housing Choice Vouchers and public housing assistance help people find more affordable housing. The ability to choose stable living conditions correlates to better economic and educational opportunities in life.

Look at the chart to your right for an overall picture of this topic, and then look at each indicator and the scores in context for more detail and additional findings.

Indicators within Availability

  • Race & Overcrowding

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of the percentage of Asian households to percentage of White households with more than one occupant per room

    What are the Results?
    Asian 16.8%; White 1.6%

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    10.5

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    1

    What Did We Find?
    There is a fairly large disparity between Asian and White households regarding having more than one occupant per room. Households with an Asian householder experience overcrowding at a much higher rate (16.8%) than households with a White householder (1.6%). Hispanic / Latino households (14.1%) are similar to Asian households, followed next by Native American (7.2%) and Black households (2.7%).

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2016 1-Year Estimates

  • Geography & Housing Choice Vouchers

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of South Tulsa to North Tulsa rate of housing choice voucher use per 1,000 residents

    What are the Results?
    South Tulsa 6.3; North Tulsa 24.1

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    0.26

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    100

    What Did We Find?
    Housing Choice Vouchers is a program of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) that provides housing assistance to low-income families. The vouchers can be used on any housing that is eligible under the requirements of the program. The rate of use of Housing Choice Vouchers is close to four times more prevalent in North Tulsa (24.1) than in South Tulsa (6.3) per 1,000 residents. West Tulsa has the second lowest rate of use (8.4), followed by East Tulsa (14.9), and Midtown (15.3).

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Housing Choice Vouchers by Census Tract; U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2015 5-Year Estimates

    Note:
    North Tulsa is generally the most disadvantaged geography. For this indicator, North Tulsa performs better than the comparison geographies, so the indicator receives a perfect score of 100. (See Methodology for more information.)

  • Race & Housing Complaints

    What is Measured?
    Ratio of the number of housing complaints per 1,000 residents in North Tulsa to South Tulsa

    What are the Results?
    North Tulsa 14.9; South Tulsa 2.9

    What is the Indicator-Level Ratio?
    5.177

    What is the Indicator-Level Score?
    20

    What Did We Find?
    Often, socioeconomic factors can impact both a homeowner’s and/or occupant’s ability to maintain their dwelling in accordance with city bylaws. Similarly, the inability of low-income renters to move out of a dwelling that is in disrepair can lead to an increase in housing complaints against landlords and property managers. North Tulsa has five times as many housing complaints (14.9) as South Tulsa (2.9) per 1,000 residents. West Tulsa has the second highest number of housing complaints (6.7), followed by East Tulsa (3.5), and Midtown (3.8).

    What Data Source(s) were Used?
    Tulsa Health Department (by request); U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2016